Free teacher training

Loka Hatha Yoga offers free teacher training for yogis seeking to volunteer with the Sheriff's Office, or provide other public service. Your help is needed. Whether you have no prior experience, or lots of prior experience, we need your help.

We invite you to participate and contribute. Contact lokahathayoga@gmail.com, or (970) 778-2835 for more information

Spring cleaning done better

It’s time for spring cleaning, and many are taking advantage Grand Junction’s generous trash service to throw out items they have been holding onto too long. However, it is easy to notice that many of these items are still usable, and could be donated to local non-profits - or gifted to even better benefit. And, much of the trash that remains is recyclable.

Spring cleaning is an excellent practice: it is not good to acquire and hold onto things unnecessarily, and each of us gains great personal benefit from letting go of those things we no longer need. However, there are better ways to discard our over-numerous possessions: it is possible to not only personally gain from the spring cleaning, but to permit others to advantage from our practice.

Selfishly depriving others of the use of our former possessions is easy, and sometimes comforting. Saying that what we give up “is useless, to me or anyone else. It is trash,” makes the letting go easier. It is much more difficult to consider the needs of those strangers in our community that are impoverished, or even our impoverished relatives, and friends, are not so different than our own. It is very difficult to understand that the difference lies only in economic means to easily acquire what we need. And it is exceedingly difficult to respect our belongings sufficiently to understand the quality and beauty of their workmanship and utility has exceeded our own requirement, and these once-precious items are worth sharing with another who needs them. To understand these items seem cheap and affordable enough to us to presently discard, only because of our great economic strength.

Understanding our economic strength implies our responsibility – toward the empowerment of those who are weaker, and to the improvement of our community by leadership.