Causes of Illogic - Anguttara Nikaya 4.77

Like rotating a picture based upon premises of
sky belonging in the top and ground below,
understanding the nature of things prevents confusion.
The Buddha Gotama said: illogic is caused, among other things, by conjecture upon false premises. He said, any conjecture from these false-premises will result in illogic, in irrationality, madness, insanity, dissatisfaction, vexation and frustration.

(1) Any conjecture on the origin of things, their moment and nature and cause of creation, must begin with a false premise. And any conjecture on the termination of things, their moment and cause of destruction, must begin with a false premise. This is because all phenomenon and their natures, all Dharma, are emergent properties co-arising from co-dependent conditions, and these are the very conditions which cause their co-termination. With the moment of creation and the moment of destruction occurring simultaneously, and interdependently, it is evident that there is no force, no power inherent within anything: for these are themselves emergent properties.

A wave cannot be caused, except when there is energy and form for it to bring into motion. And because of the resistance of the form to energy, because of the energy's wavelike nature which results in that resistance, the wave co-arises with the cause of its termination. Similarly, fire emerges from fuel, air, and spark - and the nature of these create the conditions for its extinguishment. Life itself, consciousness itself, self, identity, "soul" - these, too, are emergent properties, created at the moment of their destruction, sustained through interdependent factors, with no inherent existence of their own. To one who truly understands, neither "finite" nor "infinite" can describe the universe, for it must exist beyond space; neither "eternal" nor "non-eternal" can apply to what exists beyond time.

(2) Any conjecture on the precise consequences of actions, or things in action, must begin with a false premise. Uncertainty and randomness, chaos, must be accepted as a premise and any consequence can only be anticipated or predicted within degrees of confidence, conditionally, and limitedly. Because of limitations of observation, as well as the interdependent nature of observer and observed, as well as limitations of understanding, and the nature of phenomenon.

(3) Any conjecture on the the powers that one may manifest or realize while absorbed in Jnana or other Yoga must begin with a false premise. Power, whether innate or manifested (Avatara), is an emergent property of energy and form, which are also co-arising, co-dependent, co-terminating. There is no inherent power to realize, or manifest. No enlightenment; no buddhi, no siddhi, no riddhi. Nor any other power of a Yogi.

(4) And the Buddha said, so too, must any conjecture on the power manifested in Me, or in any Buddha (as differs from power manifested by a Buddha), begin with a false premise.