Tools and weapons of deception, illusion and delusion

Deception, illusion and delusion (Maya) are broken by a process of analysis which categorizes the phenomenon or form of Maya into its elemental components and conditional components.  This may be compared to a rainbow, which is an illusion: however, when it is analyzed, the rainbow is seen to be the result of many droplets of water prismatically reflecting, refracting and dispersing sunlight.  When the cause and components of the illusion are known, the illusionary rainbow ceases to deceive the eye into delusion.  Similar rainbows, formed by the prismatic nature of glass or diamonds, can even be reconstructed into integral white light by returning, de-refracting, focusing the light.

The rainbow is associated with Indra, a god-being whose tools include a diamond - symbolizing this ability to break deception, illusion and delusion.  This diamond takes the form of a weapon, specifically a lightning bolt, instantaneously and violently breaking Maya.  It is interesting to notice, as well, that the process of breaking Maya is identical to the process of weaving it: this is further symbolized in the other tool of Indra, the rainbow (depicted as a kind of net that both ensnares, as a typical net would, and propels missiles, as a typical bow would) itself - and how Indra fights both with weaponized Maya and against weaponized Maya.

In one particularly dramatized battle, Indra is depicted as fighting an enemy whose weapons were Maya, with his own weapons of Maya.  Equally matched, the two were consumed by the other's weapons and it took Saraswati to discern the victor: she was able to understand the intention of the deception, illusion and delusion cast by each magician by comprehending not only its ultimate (final) result, but also its ultimate (first or primordial) cause.  When she revealed these ultimate conditional causes and conditions, she broke the spells of Maya cast by both combatants, and a truce was agreed upon: though nuanced and complex, it may be summarized to say that Indra's enemy fought for hatred and revenge, both of which are self-defeating cause - whereas Indra fought for mercy and self-preservation.  Though Indra had done a great wrong, his enemy did a greater wrong through acts of hatred and revenge which harmed not only his enemy, but the entire world as well.  After the truce, the two combatants ended up fighting again, but because Indra had kept the terms of the truce, Saraswati used Maya to appear like Indra, and defending Indra, destroyed Indra's enemy.

The Arthaveda describes how to create and use these tools and use them, as well as how to weaponize Maya, to protect against fraud, deceit and criminals.  These tools (and weapons) are also described in special application within the Kamashastra. And in every Ashramic practice, it is necessary to understand not only how to break deception, illusion and delusion - but how to use them, as well, for the purpose of bringing an end to distress, the dangers of using them wrongly - and training rules for how to avoid wrong use.

Illusion is absolutely necessary for constructing abstractions which represent real phenomenon in ways more suitable to analysis, delusion is often helpful in understanding different perspectives, even deception is sometimes necessary to save a life.  Would you use Maya as a defensive weapon and lie, saying you do not know where someone is, to save their life - or even conceal them from their enemies? Would you pretend to a different identity to "walk a mile in their shoes" act as a more loyal agent in a business deal?  Would you construct elaborate illustrations and diagrams to understand geography, or astronomy?  There is good reason to rightly do these things, to rightly use Maya.  But for the purposes of fraud, to perpetrate acts of hatred and harm, Maya (whether a tool or a weapon) becomes self-destructive, and self-defeating - and cannot obtain the goal for which it is purposed.